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schools. i bought the line. i still buy the line. c-span: have you stayed with your religion all your life? >> guest: yes, i guess i have. i guess i really have -- or it stayed with me. one or the other. c-span: has it been hard? >> guest: sometimes. sometimes, yes. it's a pretty secular business. moving around the world a lot sometimes gets hard, but i think it's also your strength as well as difficult. c-span: people who are angry at the press write a lot that they don't think many members of the press are very religious. do you find that? >> guest: i don't know. you mean whether they practice a religion? c-span: we get calls here where people suggest they're even anti-religious. >> guest: yes, in a way i think for a lot of them, politics becomes their religion or broadcasting becomes their religion. c-span: conservative. >> guest: conservative, yes. i was a charter member, literally, of young americans for freedom back in the early '60s. actually it was the late '50s because i came to new york in '59. read buckley stuff. thought it was great. liked what he said. it seemed to fit in with
. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets and we learned attitude from yates and the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, overnight and laughing. i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. in the greek anthology translation by dudley fits, wonderful teacher, tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in arbor, tomorrow i said and death spoke in that little word, stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marvel that keeps's ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across the smooth table. we hundred for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. if we were going to be saved we knew it would be by literature. there was a french historian who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn from biography to life writing, history, you could think he meant to include biography and fiction, history, he said, is not a narrative, it is not analysis, it is a resurrection. this is some of what brenda wineapple has in min
and the catcher in the rye and of course there is poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets. and the learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud open night and laughing. and i love this epitaph of any change greek sailor. in a greek anthology translation from a wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen. tomorrow i will be safe that harbored. tomorrow i said and death spoken out little word. oh stranger this is the nemesis of the spoken word. fight back with daring tongue i would say tomorrow. we marveled at the ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard all rolling across the pool table. we hungered for lives that had emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets and if we were going to be saved we knew it would be by literature. there was the french historian jules michelet who put it is for me as i tried in my mid-40s to turn biography to life writing. history he said, and you could think that he meant to include fee and fiction, history he said is not narrative. it is not analysis. it is resurre
a shortcut and he was interested in gold and spending religion, but primarily it is about spaces. whatever space is so valuable that then? wasn't just the food was terrible in europe. and it was, but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. each of these new spaces where the today. so that's one of the reasons by the trade became so valuable and people risk their lives to explore these themes. so after the conquest and colonization, exporting drugs back to europe in this hemisphere as well. by drugs i mean sugar, which many people consider a job, where we get from is definitely a drug. coffee, tobacco, tea and aphrodisiac spaces. these things became the developmental and system. vast fortunes were created. think about where we are today. what was the colonial economy? these are all drugs. .. and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and of course of the fortunes that drove a lot in the european development. and so, long story short the reason have the world got colonized in some ways is because a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get up so there you have
. it was the first time discrimination had ever been used in the distinction between race, religion, etc., discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, by giving it a fame it started -- a name it started to have it own life. the ability of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin ha
. i am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. this hindu-muslim-christian- jewish-buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of saint john: "let us love one another (yes), for love is god. (yes) and every one that loveth is born of god and knoweth god. he that loveth not knoweth not god, for god is love. if we love one another, god dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us." let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. we can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. the oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. as arnold toynbee says: "love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. therefore the first hope in our
the gun. it's a religion critique of the literature. if i bought a gun, maybe i bought it because i was suicidal. you're going find more guns when you do a study. my kid didn't buy the gun and my wife didn't buy the gun. and the relative risk for them is high. it's higher for adolescence. just as the cigarettes you more the likely you are to die from lung cancer. the more unsafely you store your guns, the more likely your kid is going to commit suicide with that gun. all right. here's a slide i put together along with my colleagues deb and kathy basher. and david hemmingway, and what this is supposed to show you is how you can actually disassociate rates of mental illness from rates of completed suicide. what this graph shows so you that it graphs the states from left to right in increasing order of the rate of suicide. diset by suicide -- death by suicide. when you look at the scielings distress and you can substitute suicidal attempt. there's no correlation how often people are thinking about killing themselves. there's no correlation how often they are admitted for mental health
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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